Our Lineage

Old Kong Chow (currently known as Jiangmen Xinhui, China)was the hometown of many well-known Kungfu masters. For instance, famous Hung Gar expert Master Wong Fei Hung (1847 – 1924) was born in Xiqiao, Guangdong; Master Chan Heung who founded Choy Lee Fut martial arts in 1836 by synthesizing the essence Choy Gar, Lee Gar and Fut Gar styles was also from Xinhui, Guangdong; The popular Chou Gar Kungfu was created by the eldest of the five Chou brothers from XinhuiTangxia, Guangdong (known as “Five Tigers of Chou Gar”), who incorporated the muscular and mighty movements of Hung Gar and the swift footwork and complex kicking of Choy Gar; Grandmaster of Wing Chun kungfu, Leung Jan ( 1826 – 1901) whose real name was Leung Dak Wing, is also known as Mr Jan from Foshan.

Kong Chow ancestors taught Hung Gar, Choy Lei Fut, Wing Chun, Hung Choy and Chou Gar Kung Fu in the early days. Hung Gar is especially prevalent in Singapore Kong Chow Wui Koon today.  

Hung Kuen (洪拳)’s roots date back to the 17th century Southern Shaolin Temple in FuJian. As the Shao Lin monastery was the core of the pro-Ming anti-Qing movement, the Qing government burned down the monasteryin the 18th century. One ofthe Shao Lin Disciples Hung Hei Goon fled to Guangdong and promoted Hung Kuen there. Hung Kuen is the most famous and respected among five noted families of Kung Fu from Southern China  - namely, Hung Gar (洪家), Choy Gar  (蔡家), Lau Gar (刘家), Lee Gar (李家), and Mok Gar (莫家). Hung Kuen’s most well-known traits are firm stances and forearm strikes with short powerful movements that combine both attack and defense.

Wong Fei Hung (1847 – 1924), one of the best known Chinese martial artists in modern times, was an expert in the Hung Kuen style. Wong Fei Hung has eight close disciples, two of which are Lin Wan Kai and Lam Sai Wing. Hung Gar in Singapore Kong Chow Wui Koon benefits from a dual-lineage that can be traced back to these two grandmasters.

Our Lineage

Old Kong Chow (currently known as Jiangmen Xinhui, China)was the hometown of many well-known Kungfu masters. For instance, famous Hung Gar expert Master Wong Fei Hung (1847 – 1924) was born in Xiqiao, Guangdong; Master Chan Heung who founded Choy Lee Fut martial arts in 1836 by synthesizing the essence Choy Gar, Lee Gar and Fut Gar styles was also from Xinhui, Guangdong; The popular Chou Gar Kungfu was created by the eldest of the five Chou brothers from XinhuiTangxia, Guangdong (known as “Five Tigers of Chou Gar”), who incorporated the muscular and mighty movements of Hung Gar and the swift footwork and complex kicking of Choy Gar; Grandmaster of Wing Chun kungfu, Leung Jan ( 1826 – 1901) whose real name was Leung Dak Wing, is also known as Mr Jan from Foshan.

Kong Chow ancestors taught Hung Gar, Choy Lei Fut, Wing Chun, Hung Choy and Chou Gar Kung Fu in the early days. Hung Gar is especially prevalent in Singapore Kong Chow Wui Koon today.  

Hung Kuen (洪拳)’s roots date back to the 17th century Southern Shaolin Temple in FuJian. As the Shao Lin monastery was the core of the pro-Ming anti-Qing movement, the Qing government burned down the monasteryin the 18th century. One ofthe Shao Lin Disciples Hung Hei Goon fled to Guangdong and promoted Hung Kuen there. Hung Kuen is the most famous and respected among five noted families of Kung Fu from Southern China  - namely, Hung Gar (洪家), Choy Gar  (蔡家), Lau Gar (刘家), Lee Gar (李家), and Mok Gar (莫家). Hung Kuen’s most well-known traits are firm stances and forearm strikes with short powerful movements that combine both attack and defense.

Wong Fei Hung (1847 – 1924), one of the best known Chinese martial artists in modern times, was an expert in the Hung Kuen style. Wong Fei Hung has eight close disciples, two of which are Lin Wan Kai and Lam Sai Wing. Hung Gar in Singapore Kong Chow Wui Koon benefits from a dual-lineage that can be traced back to these two grandmasters.